SOLD OUT…Order form for Saturday ARTfarm Produce Boxes 5/2/20! Masks UP!

Hey farm supporters. If you missed it, we posted a summary of the Small Space Container Gardening for Beginners class hosted by UVI’s Cooperative Extension Service this past Monday. Lots of tips and advice for starting a small home garden!

Once again we will NOT BE OPEN for retail shopping on Saturday. For the rest of this season we are going to run socially distanced online ‘box sales’ like we did the last seven weeks, with pre-reserved pick up shifts of 10 people max, to slow the spread of novel coronavirus in our island community. We want to avoid long waits, traffic issues and crowds forming. As per the new guidelines from Government House, we require everyone picking up a box to wear a mask, and we will do the same.

About seven watermelons of small to medium size in a grey tub
The watermelons are still producing! We have some amazing heirloom varieties! Grown to meet or exceed NOP standards! Precut so you never get a dud!

Getting a farm share box is as easy as S-A-N, as in SAN-ctimonious!! Here’s what to do:

  1.   S  is for :  Sign up with our sign-up form (a link at the bottom of the weekly signup page is posted on Fridays, usually by 10am).
    • Choose one pre-selected, pre-priced box of ARTfarm produce (contents listed below)
    • Choose any add-on items (limited supplies)
    • Commit to a pick-up time slot
  2.   A is for :  Arrive on Saturday at (or wait in your car until) your appointed time in the ARTfarm parking lot on Saturday. Too many people showing up at the same time could risk exposure. Please maintain plenty of space between customers, and between us and you when you approach the pickup table. We’ll be wearing masks as an extra precaution and require that you do the same. We do it to protect you!
    • Bring exact change or a check to drop in the bucket – we are not handling any money.
    • There may be extra items available to add to your box at pickup time, so you may wish to bring some extra small bills or wait to fill in your check amount. Please bring your own pen.
    • Bring your own bags or box to put your produce into. We’ll place your items on the sanitized table, some things will be pre-bagged, you’ll pack your own bags or box for the rest. Wait to bag until we do a final count of your items to make sure we don’t forget anything.
  3.   N is for :  No substitutions or price adjustments. To maintain sanitation and keep things moving, we are not swapping items, handling payments or making change.
    • We’ll do our best to give you options at pickup if we can, to meet or exceed the value.
    • If desired, you can leave any unwanted items from your share on the table and we will pass them on to another lucky customer!

We will have 15 large and 20 small ‘farmshares’ of produce available, with lots of add-ons. You can also order and specify a neighbor, friend or family member to pick up your order. And if you are a small family and it works for you, consider alternating between large and small from week to week to give others a shot at ordering a large box.

Please contact us immediately by text and phone at (340)514-4873 if you have reserved a farmshare and cannot pick it up. Supply is limited, demand is extremely high and someone else will gladly purchase your share, if given enough time to respond. We have limited time for distributions and they are scheduled. We will hold your box for you and we expect to hear from you. We understand life happens, but please do not leave us hanging, waiting for you, with your food! Our produce is harvested fresh and needs to go home with you same day. This is an honor system since we are not collecting payment until pickup.

Box choices for Saturday, May 2nd:


Small farm share, $15, will include:

1 bag of sweet salad mix
1 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes
1 small bunch onions


Large farm share, $47, will include:

1 bag of sweet salad mix
1 bag of baby spicy salad mix
1 bunch of mature arugula (great for soups and sautées)
2 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes
1 onion bunch
1 carrot bunch with green tops for juicing
1 herb bunch (random selection)
1 bag of mixed ginger and turmeric (regular and mango-flavored)
4 seasoning peppers
2 hot peppers


Additional Limited Quantity items*

(please add to your total)
1 big watermelon chunk: $6
1 bigger watermelon chunk; $7
1 biggest watermelon chunk: $8
1 pint of cherry tomatoes: $6
1 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes: $5
1 bag sweet mix: $7
1 bag teen arugula: $11
1 bunch mixed cooking greens (kale, collards type): $3
1 bunch garlic chives: $2
1 bunch of 8 Kafir lime leaves: $2
1 bag ginger: $3.50
1 double bag ginger: $7
1 bag turmeric: $3.50
1 bag (mango-flavored) turmeric: $3.50
1 first dragonfruit of the season! WAAA magical!!: $8
1 Mediterranean fig tree (potted) $20

*Bring a handful of extra cash if you have it, there may be other additional extra items available, as usual…


large share Herb bunch options

(Large share = 1 herb selection. Choose from what’s available at pickup, or we’ll pick some for you, but these are the basic options we should have, you can start mulling it over 🙂

  • Garlic chives
  • Italian basil
  • Mint
  • Rosemary
  • Summer Savory (?)
  • Lemongrass

  • This signup form will show you a Thank You page and send you a confirmation email if submitted successfully. One order per customer, please.
  • Having problems with the online signup form?
    • Just try again
    • Use a cellular device (smartphone or tablet) that isn’t using WiFi internet
    • Clear your cache and cookies in your browser/device
    • Reboot your router (unplug it for a minute and plug in again)
  • We are asking that people ration, by not allowing any one customer to purchase all of one extra. Sharing is caring. If we have extra, we’ll do our best to let you know.
  • This signup form does NOT sign you up for a farm email subscription.

Here’s the link to Saturday May 2nd’s SIGNUP FORM
(opens a new window).

 

 

We’re Staying Home at ARTfarm.

Farmer Luca at our Socially Distanced Farmshare Distribution. Homemade cloth mask by Rose Boyan!
Farmer Luca at our Socially Distanced Farmshare Distribution. Homemade cloth mask by Rose Boyan!

The US Virgin Islands territorial government will be lifting its Stay-at-Home order on Monday, May 4th. Territorial Epidemiologist Dr. Esther Ellis said on Wednesday, April 29th, that the territory is likely only at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak. We have at-risk family members, but anyone can succumb to this, and numbers are rising in the territory.

We are informing our customers, family and friends that ARTfarm’s retail operations will continue to remain closed to the public until the coronavirus pandemic is controlled. Isolation measures are still in force for our house and family and business: SOCIAL, PHYSICAL, VOLUNTARY AND RESPONSIBLE stay-at-home isolation, extra sanitation of hands and surfaces, wearing of masks while working around people and food (or running essential errands), and practicing proactive health measures.

We will continue to distribute pre-reserved socially distanced farm shares at staggered pickup times as long as we have produce available and feel it is safe to do so.

So please continue to show us how great you look in your mask, know that we miss your smile, and be patient with this adventure we are all on together. Because we care… ❤️ STAY HOME!  (and please repost! Thank you to Yvette Browne and Beverly Joseph for starting this campaign.)

Small Container Gardening for Beginners!

A small garden bed is surrounded by rocks. Garlic chives and mint grow in partial sun.
A small wicking bed at ARTfarm holds water in a reservoir below the soil surface and produces herbs, lettuce and flowers, even in the dry season. The solar lamp in the center blocks frogs from entering a PVC pipe that is used to fill the reservoir.

Some of you who signed up for farm shares in the last few weeks have expressed interest in learning to grow your own food. We have great news! UVI’s Cooperative Extension Service will be hosting multiple FREE online video classes on Small Space Container Gardening for Beginners with Vanessa Forbes and friends, with the first session on Monday, April 27th at 10am. Everyone who signed up on our farm share order form was sent an invitation, and quite a few of you attended! Thanks!

If you missed out, the course will be repeated again. Also, below is a rough outline of what Ms. Forbes covered in the class. You can also check out this list of books to jumpstart your ideas. We are also still working on a longer article for this website with more information on gardening in the Caribbean. Soon come! Of course there are always lots of things to learn on the Internets about subtropical farming, we enjoy Rob Bob’s Permaculture YouTube Channel for ideas about container gardening!

Notes from Small Space Container Gardening for Beginners…

…held on Zoom and hosted by Vanessa Forbes, Horticultural Agent at UVI’s Cooperative Extension Service (summarized and combined here with a sprinkling of bonus thoughts from Luca, Christina, Bob and Rudy):

  1. Start with a DREAM list of what you’d like to grow, and then come up with a PLAN.
    • Start researching if the crops you like can grow in our climate, if they like wet soil or good drainage, full sun or partial shade. Hint: to grow well in a hot place with lots of bugs, you need crops that can grow quickly and be harvested before they rot or get eaten. There are varieties of crops that are specifically bred to grow better in a southern climate, so use sources of information specific to tropical climates. UGA is one source and here is a list of crops they recommend.
    • Ask your neighbors (with similar conditions) what crops have been successful for them. Literally small differences in exposure, wind, soil type and rainfall can make a huge difference. Things we could grow at Southgate in the old days (1998-2007) we can’t grow at ARTfarm (2008-present), and vice versa. So ask your neighbors! Wearing a mask! From six feet or more away!!
    • Visit the VI Department of Agriculture. In the greenhouse area (all the way in the back, east of the abbatoir), they sell slips (baby plant starts) to the public, for selected popular vegetable varieties that are proven in our climate.
    • With COVID-19 affecting businesses and shipping, some online seed companies are only supplying commercial growers right now (spring 2020), but local hardware stores may have seed.
    • Water is a precious resource. Start small and expand your project once you have done some experimenting!

  2. Location is important. SCOUT the spot for your container garden.
    • What conditions do your dream crops need? Is your proposed spot sunny/windy?
    • Is there enough space? Info on seed packets will often include recommended spacing between plants for optimal yields and plant health.
    • Is there a water source nearby? Does any excess water draining from your pots have a place to go?
    • Is it located in a spot where you’ll pass by frequently and remember to check on it?
    • Is it accessible to pets/pests/wildlife who might damage or teef your crops? Think of deer, iguanas, trushie bird dem, neighborhood cats looking for a litter box, chickens, rambunctious dogs… but don’t forget that some wildlife is important for pest control and pollination. Observe closely and you’ll begin to learn who eats what.
    • If you decide to grow on bare ground, don’t forget about root competition. A raised bed garden on the soil surface in your yard that is regularly watered will become a mecca for every surface tree root within 50 ft. and you will soon be watering a forest around your garden, unless you cut and trim a “root moat” around your garden.

  3. CREATE imaginative spaces for your plants.
    • MINI crops like a single herb, succulents or flowers can thrive in a large tin can, an old shoe or purse, a teacup or coffee mug…
    • MEDIUM sized crops like taller herbs, pollinator attracting flowers, can grow in planters, windowboxes, tires, vertical pallet gardens.
    • LARGE crops like lettuces, cooking greens, can be grown in vertical pallet gardens, raised beds, tires, cinderblock raised beds
    • DEEP crops with a substantial taproot like tomatoes, carrots, root vegetables; or with a vining tendency like cucumbers or melons, will need a larger garden bed with deeper soil depth.
    • Drainage is important. Most crop plants do not want to sit in heavy wet clay soil; they need aeration at the roots. So make sure to toss a few pebbles or some mulch in the bottom of grow containers or otherwise make sure the soil doesn’t clog up the drainage holes.
    • Fabric or poly reusable shopping bags past their useful life for groceries can be repurposed in the garden as a permeable growbag. You can place several of them together to create a little garden bed.
    • Tires as planters are a great way to UPCYCLE. Cut them apart with a sawzall power tool or simple box cutter, using safety protective gear in case you hit a steel belt radial while cutting. Tires are still being studied for the uptake by plants of chemical leaching, so to be on the safe side for food crops, line tires with water permeable landscape fabric/cardboard/paper, and/or consider painting them to seal in any dry rotting synthetic rubber polymers that may escape (of course paints are polymers too!). Use tire planters in partial shade to slow their degradation, and remember they can be stacked up to accommodate deeper rooting plants.
    • Shipping pallets are very popular for repurposing as planters, as they are often made of naturally termite-resistant tropical hardwoods. There are entire Pinterest channels devoted to their clever use either whole or disassembled for all kinds of gardening, storage, woodworking and crafting. Selecting safe, clean, untreated pallets is important so that they don’t contain harmful chemicals. Look for pallets stamped ‘HT’ for Heat Treated. (Pallets without the HT stamp may have been treated with highly toxic methyl bromide, which could leach into your crops!) Pallets can be used flat on the ground as is, filled with soil as a raised bed with plants growing between the slats. They can be wrapped with landscape fabric, propped up on end, filled from the top with soil, and propped up or hung on a wall as a vertical garden. You can place four of them on end in a box formation attached at the corners, to create a composting bin.
    • Plastic shipping barrels and old rum barrels make functional and even beautiful containers for planting. Drill holes for drainage.
    • Kiddie pools or wading pools can be repurposed as bottom waterers for your containers or growbags. Drill some holes in the sides a few inches from the bottom to allow excess rainwater to escape without drowning your plants. Anyplace in your container garden where water may sit, treat with a little food-safe soap or neem oil (from the hardware store garden section) to keep mosquitos from breeding within.
    • Cover your small garden area with a wire mesh tent or other barrier to discourage the hungry critters from feasting and exploring your little Eden. You will want pollinators to be able to get in, so use an open mesh such as hardware cloth or chicken wire!
    • Finish your containers with safety in mind. Make sure there are no sharp edges or tripping hazards to catch on clothing or skin, when you’re done.
    • Make sure you CLEAN any old repurposed or previously gardened containers prior to use. Chemical residue, funguses and plant viruses, even eggs from pests can remain on old containers, so clean them as if your food was going to touch them. (It is.)

  4. Now that your containers are ready and clean, let’s SOIL them.
    • Most trucking companies on St. Croix sell ‘topsoil’ but it’s often subsoil – soil that is heavier with more mineral content, with much less organic matter (humus) in it. Caribbean islands generally have very little topsoil. Create good topsoil by mulching, resting, crop rotating, aerating, and compost amending, your soil.
    • Bringing in topsoil from elsewhere on the island may invite weeds and pests to your property that were not already there.
    • Organic potting soil from the hardware store may be your best choice.
    • Mulch (chipped plant debris from Hurricane Maria) is available at the Department of Agriculture and by appointment at Body Slob dump site in Kingshill. You can also mulch with yard clippings, but be careful not to mow seedy grass as mulch unless you love weeding!
    • Pickup truck loads (or a few buckets) of sheep manure for composting and soil amending can usually be purchased through the Schuster family at Echo Valley Farm. Stop by their tire shop to inquire. The number is (340) 719-9944.

  5. Start your grand garden EXPERIMENT! (Here are some rando tips!)
    • Don’t count on huge yields that replace your need to grocery shop right away.
    • Remember that the soil in containers and pots will dry out much faster than ground garden soil. So keep checking moisture levels (a terracotta “worm” that changes color is a fun way to monitor soil moisture – or your finger is a higher tech, less expensive option you’ll probably never misplace)
    • The soil in container gardens can get compacted much faster than in a ground garden plot. Be sure to recycle your soil and repot your container garden on a regular basis to fluff things up.
    • Your plants will continue to remove minerals and nutrition from the soil, and you’ll need to amend it from time to time (hopefully with homemade compost from your own kitchen!). Repotting, rotating, and cleaning your containers when trouble arises, can reduce the effect of residual problems compounding over time that could lessen your success.
    • If you really want to get fancy with your bad hippie organic food-growing self, start learning about companion planting.
    • In general, watering in the evening saves more water and is more useful for your plants.
    • Drip or emitter irrigation conserves water, and lessens the spread of some plant funguses, diseases and pests compared to simply spraying your garden with a garden hose.
    • Gird your loins to the idea that you may have to grab an icky caterpillar or grasshopper or stink bug with your bare fingers and squish it. Unless you want to share all your crops with nature.
    • Weeds can be gorgeous. Native pollinators love them. Allow some biodiversity.
    • Observe, observe, observe. As with any other health concern, it’s best to detect an issue early on instead of when it is too late. Watch your plants like a hawk. Learn the difference between plant-destroying bugs and bugs who eat those other bugs. Don’t just try to kill everything with six or more legs!

There will be more classes coming up from UVI CES on container gardening. We’ll try to post more information as it emerges! If we forgot anything, please include it in the comments (link at the top of the article)! And PLEASE share pictures of your mighty garden with us!!

Order form for Saturday ARTfarm Produce Boxes 4/25/20, Shrinking Heads

Hey farm supporters. We have a reduced offering today because of reduced production: the hotter weather at this time of year causes crops (especially lettuce) to grow more slowly.

Those of you who have expressed interest already, or do so on today’s form submission, will be sent a link to attend an online Small Space Container Gardening for Beginners class hosted by UVI’s Cooperative Extension Service on Monday, April 27th at 10am. Hopefully there will be a replay available if you can’t attend at the scheduled time. Sign up!!

Once again we will NOT BE OPEN for retail shopping on Saturday. For the rest of this season we are going to run socially distanced online ‘box sales’ like we did the last six weeks, with pre-reserved pick up shifts of 10 people max, to slow the spread of novel coronavirus in our island community. We want to avoid long waits, traffic issues and crowds forming. We encourage everyone picking up a box to wear a mask, and we will do the same.

‘Maters and cukes!

Getting a farm share box is as easy as S-A-N, as in SAN-ford and Son!! Here’s what to do:

  1.   S  is for :  Sign up with our sign-up form (a link at the bottom of the weekly signup page is posted on Fridays, usually by 10am).
    • Choose one pre-selected, pre-priced box of ARTfarm produce (contents listed below)
    • Choose any add-on items (limited supplies)
    • Commit to a pick-up time slot
  2.   A is for :  Arrive on Saturday at (or wait in your car until) your appointed time in the ARTfarm parking lot on Saturday. Too many people showing up at the same time could risk exposure. Please maintain plenty of space between customers, and between us and you when you approach the pickup table. We’ll be wearing masks as an extra precaution and ask that you do the same.
    • Bring exact change or a check to drop in the bucket – we are not handling any money.
    • There may be extra items available to add to your box at pickup time, so you may wish to bring some extra small bills or wait to fill in your check amount. Please bring your own pen.
    • Bring your own bags or box to put your produce into. We’ll place your items on the sanitized table, some things will be pre-bagged, you’ll pack your own bags or box for the rest. Wait to bag until we do a final count of your items to make sure we don’t forget anything.
  3.   N is for :  No substitutions or price adjustments. To maintain sanitation and keep things moving, we are not swapping items, handling payments or making change.
    • We’ll do our best to give you options at pickup if we can, to meet or exceed the value.
    • If desired, you can leave any unwanted items from your share on the table and we will pass them on to another lucky customer!

We will have 15 large and 22 small ‘farmshares’ of produce available. You can also order and specify a neighbor, friend or family member to pick up your order. And if you are a small family and it works for you, consider alternating between large and small from week to week to give others a shot at ordering a large box.

Please contact us immediately by text and phone at (340)514-4873 if you have reserved a farmshare and cannot pick it up. Supply is limited, demand is extremely high and someone else will gladly purchase your share, if given enough time to respond. We have limited time for distributions and they are scheduled. We will hold your box for you and we expect to hear from you. We understand life happens, but please do not leave us hanging, waiting for you, with your food! Our produce is harvested fresh and needs to go home with you same day. This is an honor system since we are not collecting payment until pickup.

Box choices for Saturday, April 25th:


Small farm share, $14, will include:

1 bag of sweet salad mix
1 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes
1 bunch garlic chives


Large farm share, $53, will include:

1 bag of sweet salad mix
1 bag of teen spicy salad mix
1 bag of baby arugula
2 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes
1 onion bunch
1 radish bunch with edible green tops for cooking
2 herb bunches (random selection)
1 bag of mixed ginger and turmeric (regular and mango-flavored)
4 seasoning peppers


Additional Limited Quantity items*

(please add to your total)
1 pint of cherry tomatoes: $6
1 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes: $5
1 lb. cucumbers: $3
1 bunch mixed cooking greens (kale, collards type): $3
1 bag ginger: $3.50
1 bag turmeric: $3.50
1 bag (mango-flavored) turmeric: $3.50
1 Mediterranean fig tree (potted) $28

*(we are not offering pre-reserve on watermelon chunks this week, they will be first-come first-serve, one per customer, priced between $5-8.) There may be other additional items available, as usual…


large share Herb bunch options

(Large share = 2 herb selections. Choose from what’s available at pickup, or we’ll pick some for you, but these are the basic options we should have, you can start mulling it over 🙂

  • Garlic chives
  • Italian basil
  • Lemon basil
  • Thai basil
  • Mint
  • Dill / Dill Seed
  • Parsley
  • Rosemary
  • Lemongrass

 

  • This signup form will show you a Thank You page and send you a confirmation email if submitted successfully. One order per customer, please.
  • Three people reported having problems with the online signup form telling them incorrectly that they had already placed an order. It’s an overzealous security feature to prevent multiple orders from the same customer. Workarounds our customers figured out (thank you!!) were to
    • just try again
    • use a cellular device (smartphone or tablet) that isn’t using WiFi internet
    • clear your cache and cookies in your browser/device
    • reboot your router (unplug it for a minute and plug in again)
  • We are asking that people ration, by not allowing any one customer to purchase all of one extra. Sharing is caring. If we have extra, we’ll do our best to let you know.
  • This signup form does NOT sign you up for a farm email subscription.

Here’s the link to Saturday April 25th’s SIGNUP FORM
(opens a new window).

 

 

Order form for Saturday ARTfarm Produce Boxes 4/18/20, Commit to Health

Hey farm supporters. We are seeing some production reduction with the weather getting hotter, so the boxes are a little smaller this week, but the tomatoes keep on coming! We have fig trees on the add-ons list, and we’ll have an article coming out soon on planting a garden at home.

Thanks to everyone’s careful participation, the pickups are smooth, and we appreciate everyone who has been consistently maintaining at least 10-15 feet of distance, wearing masks to keep each other safe, and being patient with us and each other. We thank you for maintaining physical distance, as do all the medical professionals in the territory. Stay the course, folks!

Once again we will NOT BE OPEN for retail shopping on Saturday. For the rest of this season we are going to run socially distanced online ‘box sales’ like we did the last five weeks, with pre-reserved pick up shifts of 10 people max, to slow the spread of novel coronavirus in our island community. We want to avoid long waits, traffic issues and crowds forming. We encourage everyone picking up a box to wear a mask, and we will do the same.

watermelon cut into chunks and bagged in plastic
Sweet juicy watermelon. We pre-cut to make sure you don’t get a dud, and to share the harvest.

Getting a farm share box is as easy as S-A-N, as in parm-e-SAN-!! Here’s what to do:

  1.   S  is for :  Sign up with our sign-up form (a link at the bottom of the weekly signup page is posted on Fridays, usually by 10am).
    • Choose one pre-selected, pre-priced box of ARTfarm produce (contents listed below)
    • Choose any add-on items (limited supplies)
    • Commit to a pick-up time slot
  2.   A is for :  Arrive on Saturday at (or wait in your car until) your appointed time in the ARTfarm parking lot on Saturday. Too many people showing up at the same time could risk exposure. Please maintain plenty of space between customers, and between us and you when you approach the pickup table. We’ll be wearing masks as an extra precaution and ask that you do the same.
    • Bring exact change or a check to drop in the bucket – we are not handling any money.
    • There may be unadvertised extra items available to add to your box at pickup time, so you may wish to bring some extra small bills or wait to fill in your check amount. Please bring your own pen.
    • Bring your own bags or box to put your produce into. We’ll place your items on the sanitized table, some things will be pre-bagged, you’ll pack your own bags or box for the rest. Wait to bag until we do a final count of your items to make sure we don’t forget anything.
  3.   N is for :  No substitutions or price adjustments. To maintain sanitation and keep things moving, we are not swapping items, handling payments or making change.
    • We’ll do our best to give you options at pickup if we can, to meet or exceed the value.
    • If desired, you can leave any unwanted items from your share on the table and we will pass them on to another lucky customer!

We will have 15 large and 30 small ‘farmshares’ of produce available (a few of those available as “double small” orders). You can also order and specify a neighbor, friend or family member to pick up your order. And if you are a small family and it works for you, consider alternating between large and small from week to week to give others a shot at ordering a large box.

Please contact us immediately by text and phone at (340)514-4873 if you have reserved a farmshare and cannot pick it up. Supply is limited, demand is extremely high and someone else will gladly purchase your share, if given enough time to respond. We have limited time for distributions and they are scheduled. We will hold your box for you and we expect to hear from you. We understand life happens, but please do not leave us hanging, waiting for you, with your food! Our produce is harvested fresh and needs to go home with you same day. This is an honor system since we are not collecting payment until pickup.

Box choices for Saturday, April 18th:


Small farm share, $13, will include:

1 bag of sweet salad mix
1 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes
1 herb bunch (random selection)


Double Small farm share, $28, will include:

As listed above, but double: one for you and one for a friend. Take distribution into your own (recently washed) hands, deliver to a neighbor or loved one!


Large farm share, $51, will include:

1 bag of sweet salad mix
1 bag of teen spicy salad mix
1 bag of teen arugula
1 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes
2 lb. watermelon quarter
1 turnip bunch with edible green tops for cooking
1 bunch mixed cooking greens (kale, collards type)
2 herb bunches (random selection)
1 bag of mixed ginger and turmeric (regular and mango-flavored)
4 seasoning peppers


Additional Limited Quantity Add-Ons*

(please add to your total)
1 pint of cherry tomatoes: $6
1 lb. bag of slicer tomatoes: $5
1 lb. cucumbers: $3
2 lb. watermelon quarter: $5
2 lb. pumpkin quarter: $6
1 bag (mango-flavored) turmeric: $3.50
1 bunch extra garlic chives: $2
1 Mediterranean fig tree (potted) $28

*(there are often additional extras available at the time of pick-up, so if you can’t reserve, bring some extra cash or wait to write your check total. Bring a pen.)


Herb bunch options

(Large share = 2 herb selections, Small share = 1 herb selection. Choose from what’s available at pickup, or we’ll pick some for you, but these are the basic options we should have, you can start mulling it over 🙂

  • Garlic chives
  • Italian basil
  • Lemon basil
  • Thai basil
  • Mint
  • Dill / Dill Seed
  • Parsley
  • Rosemary
  • Lemongrass

 

  • This signup form will show you a Thank You page and send you a confirmation email if submitted successfully. One order per customer, please.
  • Three people reported having problems with the online signup form telling them incorrectly that they had already placed an order. It’s an overzealous security feature to prevent multiple orders from the same customer. Workarounds our customers figured out (thank you!!) were to
    • just try again
    • use a cellular device (smartphone or tablet) that isn’t using WiFi internet
    • clear your cache and cookies in your browser/device
    • reboot your router (unplug it for a minute and plug in again)
  • We are asking that people ration, by not allowing any one customer to purchase all of one extra. Sharing is caring. If we have extra, we’ll do our best to let you know.
  • This signup form does NOT sign you up for a farm email subscription.

Here’s the link to Saturday April 18th’s SIGNUP FORM
(opens a new window).

 

 

Staying Healthy in the Virus Times – Ginger and Turmeric

The farm share signup post will be up at 10am! Just wanted to share some extra health inspiration this morning…

The COVID-19 pandemic is a terrible crisis, but the silver lining might be an opportunity to slow down, reprioritize and focus on health. Already the shutdown has slowed pollution in some major cities. We feel lucky that we have so many holistic (big picture) health practitioners on St. Croix to help us be proactive about health. We wanted to share a couple of simple ginger and turmeric drink ideas, and some timely health reminders from one of our longtime customers, Rhonda Pessin, who happens to be a Certified Nutritional Consultant, Board Certified Massage Therapist, yoga instructor, and sprouts farmer at Alive and Well in Five Corners, St. Croix USVI.

Ginger Tea

This is the simplest recipe. Ginger tea is warming and refreshing at the same time. Ginger is being studied for its anti-viral qualities. A ginger tea is great for the beginning of a sore throat, for the start of a cold, and for treating and soothing congestion. Simply boil fresh water and pour over thinly sliced ‘coins’ of ginger root. Add a little local honey for a cough. Breathe in the gingery steam and then enjoy it as hot as you can stand. Crunch up and eat the ginger coins at the bottom of your cup when you’re done. For a bad cold, alternate making this sweet spicy tea with a savory version: add minced onion, rub the inside of your cup with a cut clove of garlic, and add a spoon of miso for a healing, soothing, quick broth.

Turmeric Golden Milk

This is an ancient recipe with many variations. Turmeric, when consumed with black pepper, has anti-inflammatory compounds and may inhibit viruses. It is one of those roots that changes its flavor profile when cooked, so don’t be deterred by its earthy profile when raw. We like to take fresh or frozen turmeric and grate it with a microplane into a small saucepan, about an inch of root per 8 oz. serving or to taste. Add either fresh, canned or powdered coconut milk. Add water (if using powdered milk), a dollop of honey or molasses if desired, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and heat through until just steaming. For an extra anti-inflammatory kick, add a few thin slices of cayenne or chili pepper as a garnish on top.

COVID–19: Rhonda’s Ten Tips for Staying Well

Rhonda Pessin, Certified Nutrition Consultant and ARTfarm customer!

  1. Reduce your stress. Chronic stress weakens your immune system. Take a break from news, phone, internet etc. and unplug for a little while every day.
  2. Exercise. Boosts immune system – 30 minutes a day of walking, swimming, yoga etc., is enough to make a difference.
  3. Sleep. Get 7-9 hours a night.
  4. Eat the rainbow. Colorful fruits and veggies are full of antioxidants. These guard against free radicals that can harm your cells. Try eating a wide range of leafy greens, berries, oranges, carrots, peppers, red grapes, beets etc.
  5. Minimize sugar and junk food, which can greatly lower the function of your immune system.
  6. Laugh. Find ways to laugh and stay positive. Having a positive outlook will do more for your immune system than stress or worry.
  7. Reach out. Stay connected to support. Use care providers, family and friends to get support if you need it. Staying well is a group effort.
  8. Take good quality supplements. (Many of these are out of stock but will be replenished soon hopefully.)
    • Supplements may possibly reduce symptoms of coronavirus.
    • No supplements at this time are known to prevent it.
    • Read all labels and do your research to make sure supplements are compatible with any medications you are taking.
    • Vitamins and minerals can help especially if you are not getting enough. High stress increases requirements for B, C and others.
    • Multi-Vitamin & Mineral- choose good quality. The most absorbable by the human body are whole food organic fermented vitamins (made wholly from food), like Organixx or New Chapter. “Food-based” vitamins may have a “base” of food ingredients, but contain primarily synthetic vitamins.
    • Vitamin C – 500 mg twice a day or more to tolerance – may upset stomach in large doses.
    • Vitamin D – may help respiratory infections – 2000 IU.
    • Zinc – 20 mcg – up to 50mcg if symptomatic.
    • Probiotics – 25 billion. I like Garden of Life. Do not waste $ on cheap options.
    • Reishi or medicinal mushrooms. Follow label instructions.
    • Colloidal silver – follow product label.
    • Quercetin – found to inhibit wide variety of viruses including SARS – there are current clinical trials in China to see if it affects COVID-19 (according to consumerlab.com) – dose 50-1000 mg. Headaches and nausea can occur over 500 mg.
  9. Use healing herbs.
    • Elderberry extract – has been known to shorten the flu. No evidence yet on COVID-19. Follow label.
    • Virgin and extra virgin coconut oil – 3 Tbspn daily. Known to have anti-viral effects, being tested.
    • Curcumin and Turmeric – can inhibit viruses. Protects lung tissue with anti-inflammatory effects. I recommend Root 2 or Garden of life. Follow label for dosage.
    • Echinacea – has been shown to inhibit other viruses but not yet tested.
    • Garlic – has been shown to inhibit other viruses but not yet tested.
    • Astragulus, licorice root, olive leaf, oregano oil, ginger, green tea, ginseng and dandelion- all have anti-viral qualities.
  10. Eat well. Prepare delicious, healthy meals with love and RELAX when eating them. Take a few breaths, take in aromas and say a prayer of gratitude. This will help your nervous system switch from sympathetic (fight or flight, work!!) to parasympathetic (relaxation, digestion).

You can reach Rhonda for additional recommendations. Reach out for an appointment or consultation by phone: (340) 277-4006 or via e-mail.

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